Black and WTF

Posted by: admin on March 21, 2011 @ 3:44 pm
Filed under: Culture

I love this site Black and WTF. But today’s post is extra special in that it features one of my silent star favorites, Mabel Normand, posing in front of an elephant made out of walnuts. Exactly.

Mabel Normand, with elephant

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Dick Buckley’s Record Collection

Posted by: admin on February 15, 2011 @ 8:19 am
Filed under: Chicago News, Culture, Events, Listening

For those who don’t know Mr. Buckley, he was a Chicago radio DJ for the better part of last century up until July 2008. His 3-hr show would accompany the weekend afternoon for me and my old roommate. We’d sip our coffee, and he would spin some of the best jazz we’d ever heard—rarely anything we knew. We always joked that there was no one in the world who knew more about early jazz than he did—“That was from 1943 with Jimmy Bognerfeld on trombone… Hmmm… I didn’t know Jimmy played trombone. He’s a drummer!”

There is still a pretty big void on the weekend since his final show. Still hoping that someone will start releasing them as podcasts—if they got recorded at all.

Dick Buckley's Record Collection

But now, via Chicago Sun Times, I find out that…

His collection of more than 8,000 jazz LPs, 45s, 78s, CDs, EPs and homemade mix tapes will be auctioned off Thursday at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, 1338 W. Lake. A party with background music is open to the public at 5 tonight. (RSVP by calling 312-280-1212.) Beer and cognac, Buckley’s favorite drinks, will be served.

The collection will be offered in 92 box lots of approximately 100 items each, grouped by style (Dixieland, Kansas City, etc.), artist (“Women of Jazz,” lots of Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald), instrument (trombones, trumpet, guitar heavy on Wes Montgomery) and format.

Reading that made my 7AM-eyes open up right quick.

Along with the record collection, there is also, “reel-to-reels of Buckley interviews and bootleg Duke Ellington recordings that are hand-scrawled; “Jan. 20, 1946 — Civic Opera House, Program No. 33; ‘Caravan’, etc.” —thought DD might dig on that.

For those in Chicago that are interested, the auction is at 5PM on Thursday at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, 1338 W. Lake.

Thanks to Matt Priest for hipping me to this story.

6 Comments

Dick Buckley's Record Collection

Posted by: admin on @ 8:19 am
Filed under: Chicago News, Culture, Events, Listening

For those who don’t know Mr. Buckley, he was a Chicago radio DJ for the better part of last century up until July 2008. His 3-hr show would accompany the weekend afternoon for me and my old roommate. We’d sip our coffee, and he would spin some of the best jazz we’d ever heard—rarely anything we knew. We always joked that there was no one in the world who knew more about early jazz than he did—“That was from 1943 with Jimmy Bognerfeld on trombone… Hmmm… I didn’t know Jimmy played trombone. He’s a drummer!”

There is still a pretty big void on the weekend since his final show. Still hoping that someone will start releasing them as podcasts—if they got recorded at all.

Dick Buckley's Record Collection

But now, via Chicago Sun Times, I find out that…

His collection of more than 8,000 jazz LPs, 45s, 78s, CDs, EPs and homemade mix tapes will be auctioned off Thursday at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, 1338 W. Lake. A party with background music is open to the public at 5 tonight. (RSVP by calling 312-280-1212.) Beer and cognac, Buckley’s favorite drinks, will be served.

The collection will be offered in 92 box lots of approximately 100 items each, grouped by style (Dixieland, Kansas City, etc.), artist (“Women of Jazz,” lots of Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald), instrument (trombones, trumpet, guitar heavy on Wes Montgomery) and format.

Reading that made my 7AM-eyes open up right quick.

Along with the record collection, there is also, “reel-to-reels of Buckley interviews and bootleg Duke Ellington recordings that are hand-scrawled; “Jan. 20, 1946 — Civic Opera House, Program No. 33; ‘Caravan’, etc.” —thought DD might dig on that.

For those in Chicago that are interested, the auction is at 5PM on Thursday at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, 1338 W. Lake.

Thanks to Matt Priest for hipping me to this story.

6 Comments

Top 100 jazz tracks? Too tough.

Posted by: admin on February 10, 2011 @ 1:23 pm
Filed under: Culture, Listening

Lots of chatter about jazz24’s listener polled list of the Top 100 tracks of jazz. A lot of the usual chatter—list is incomplete, too focused on the old, nothing of the avant, etc. After reading Peter Hum’s Jazz Post-1980s thoughts (thanks for mentioning Dave’s Moonshine btw), I thought I’d throw my hat in the ring ever so slightly.

First, that list is a list of almost all tracks that I love. I don’t listen to much of Dave Brubeck or Benny Goodman, but that’s my taste, and certainly don’t slight that material. And I’d probably have put A Love Supreme, Part II – Resolution on the list rather than … – Acknowledgement. Regardless, here are some tracks that I personally can’t and couldn’t have lived without.

(more…)

3 Comments

Another Moment to Write a Letter.

Posted by: Dave Douglas on January 26, 2011 @ 8:45 am
Filed under: Culture

It’s quick. It’s easy. It’s important. Let your representatives know what the arts mean to you. Americans for the Arts allow you to do that in several ways. A letter in the mail is always the most effective, but email is also heard. Thanks.

1 Comment

About Those Jets’ Fundamentals

Posted by: admin on January 25, 2011 @ 12:19 pm
Filed under: Culture, Dave Douglas (Artist Thoughts)

Reader HL asks…

I wanted to ask you a question about composing. In sports, it is said that when two high levels opponents meet, the one with the strongest fundamentals is the one that wins. I was thinking about this watching the NFL playoffs this past weekend when all of the sudden teams were busting out their running game more than they ever had during the regular season. Sports metaphor aside, I was thinking about how great musicians also appear to have the strongest fundamentals.

In playing an instrument the fundamentals are rather obvious. How’s your sound, your intonation, your articulation, your air support, you hand position, etc…? And each instrument has exercises to address this concerns. But in the realm of composition they don’t seem as obvious to me. What do you consider to be the fundamentals of good composition and how do you go about continuing to develop them? How do you write better compositions as opposed to just more compositions?

My first reaction is to say that, well, music is obviously not sports. No one “wins” or “loses.” The basis for judgment is subjective and new music can only be valued on its own terms.

But putting that aside because there is something to this question and asking rather — What are the basic traits that make a composer whose music we like? What do you hear as the “fundamentals of good composition?” Accepting that the answer will be different for everybody (though probably with some healthy overlap) takes you away from the NY Times approach of last week’s Top Ten Composers Of All Time post. Anybody else surprised there were no Americans, women, or Dukes of Ellington?

Curious for all takes on the issue. Listeners and musicians.

8 Comments

About Those Jets' Fundamentals

Posted by: Dave Douglas on @ 12:19 pm
Filed under: Culture, Dave Douglas (Artist Thoughts)

Reader HL asks…

I wanted to ask you a question about composing. In sports, it is said that when two high levels opponents meet, the one with the strongest fundamentals is the one that wins. I was thinking about this watching the NFL playoffs this past weekend when all of the sudden teams were busting out their running game more than they ever had during the regular season. Sports metaphor aside, I was thinking about how great musicians also appear to have the strongest fundamentals.

In playing an instrument the fundamentals are rather obvious. How’s your sound, your intonation, your articulation, your air support, you hand position, etc…? And each instrument has exercises to address this concerns. But in the realm of composition they don’t seem as obvious to me. What do you consider to be the fundamentals of good composition and how do you go about continuing to develop them? How do you write better compositions as opposed to just more compositions?

My first reaction is to say that, well, music is obviously not sports. No one “wins” or “loses.” The basis for judgment is subjective and new music can only be valued on its own terms.

But putting that aside because there is something to this question and asking rather — What are the basic traits that make a composer whose music we like? What do you hear as the “fundamentals of good composition?” Accepting that the answer will be different for everybody (though probably with some healthy overlap) takes you away from the NY Times approach of last week’s Top Ten Composers Of All Time post. Anybody else surprised there were no Americans, women, or Dukes of Ellington?

Curious for all takes on the issue. Listeners and musicians.

8 Comments

A Mile of Music.

Posted by: Dave Douglas on January 10, 2011 @ 9:25 am
Filed under: Culture, Dave Douglas (Artist Thoughts)
Billie, by Don Hunstein

The Library of Congress has begun taking possession of a huge donation of recordings, some 200,000 metal, glass and lacquer master discs from the period 1926 to 1948 that have been languishing in the subterranean vaults of Universal Music Group, the largest music conglomerate in the United States.

The bequest, which is to be formally announced on Monday, contains music representing every major genre of American popular song of that era — jazz, blues, country and the smooth pop of the pre-rock-’n’-roll period — as well as some light classical and spoken-word selections. One historic highlight is the master recording of Bing Crosby’s 1947 version of “White Christmas,” which according to Guinness World Records is the best-selling single of all time.

Link to the NY Times article.

Fun Fact: According to Tablet, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas is one of the 100 Greatest Jewish Songs of All Time.

The typically modest Berlin:

“Not only is it the best song I ever wrote,” said Irving Berlin when he finished writing “White Christmas,” “it’s the best song anybody ever wrote.”

1 Comment

The Sound Of Community

Posted by: admin on December 14, 2010 @ 9:34 am
Filed under: Culture, Education

Setting aside all the CD sales going on everywhere you look and click, if you are thinking of giving to a great cause this year…

Sound Of Community

There’s a great video over there to check out.

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Jazz Robots

Posted by: admin on November 24, 2010 @ 9:20 am
Filed under: Culture, Humor

Q: “Have you been in the shed?”
A: “I have been in the shed.”

I know it has already made the rounds, and I’m a little late to post, but still pretty hilarious. Lots of reply vids over on Youtube as well.

2 Comments

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